Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" These are thy glorious works, Parent of good, Almighty, thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair ; thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable, who sitt'st above these heavens, To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest works; yet these declare... "
Paradise Lost: A Poem in Twelve Books - Page 107
by John Milton - 1899 - 372 pages
Full view - About this book

The English Reader, Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry: From the Best Writers ...

Lindley Murray - English literature - 1827 - 262 pages
...declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and pow'r divine. Speak ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels ; for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle his throne rejoicing ; ye, in heaven, On earth, join all ye creatures to extol Him first, Him last, Him midst,...
Full view - About this book

The casket of poesy [ed. by J. Cole].

John Cole - 1827 - 166 pages
...declare Thy goo dness beyond thought, and power divine. Speak ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels; for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle his throne rejoicing; ye, in heaven, On earth, join all ye creatures to extol Him first, Him last, Him midst,...
Full view - About this book

Exercises in Reading and Recitation

Jonathan Barber - Readers, American - 1828 - 251 pages
...thine this universal frame, Thus wond'rous fair: Thyself how wond'rous, thru. Unspeakable! who sitt'st above these heavens, To us invisible, or dimly seen...divine. Speak ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels! for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle his throne...
Full view - About this book

Extracts from ancient and modern authors, arranged so as to form a history ...

Extracts - 1828 - 786 pages
...thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair; thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable ! who sitt'st above these heavens, To us invisible, or dimly seen...divine. Speak, ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels! for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle his throne...
Full view - About this book

The Sacred Lyre: Comprising Poems, Devotional, Moral and Preceptive ...

Christian poetry, English - 1828 - 360 pages
...thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair ; thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable, who sitt'st above these Heavens To us invisible, or dimly seen...yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and pow'r divine. Speak ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels; for ye behold him, and with songs...
Full view - About this book

Exercises in Reading and Recitations: Founded on the Enquiry in the ...

John Barber - Elocution - 1828 - 300 pages
...then ! Unspeakable! who sitt'st above these heavens To us invisiblejor dimly seen In these thy lower works ; yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought...divine. Speak, ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels ; for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies day without night, Cifcle his throne,...
Full view - About this book

An Illustration of the Principles of Elocution ...

William Brittainham Lacey - Elocution - 1828 - 308 pages
...! Unspeakable ! who sitt'st above these heav'ns, To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lower works ; yet these declare Thy goodness (beyond thought,)...power divine. Speak (ye who best can tell,) ye sons oflight, Angels ; for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without night, Circle...
Full view - About this book

Analysis of the Principles of Rhetorical Delivery as Applied in Reading and ...

Ebenezer Porter - Elocution - 1828 - 418 pages
...frame, Thus wondrous fair; thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable, who sitt'st above these heav'ns 5 To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest...yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and pow'r divine. Speak, ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, 'Angels ; for ye behold him, and with...
Full view - About this book

An Essay on Elocution: With Elucidatory Passages from Various Authors

John Hanbury Dwyer - Elocution - 1828 - 314 pages
...frame, Thus wondrous fair ; thyself how wondrous then ! Unspeakable, who sitt'st above these heav'ns To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest...yet these declare Thy goodness, beyond thought, and pow'r divine. Speak ye who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels ; for ye behold him, and with songs...
Full view - About this book

Moral and Sacred Poetry

Thomas Willcocks - 1829 - 332 pages
...this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair; thyself how wondrous then I Unspeakable ; who sit'st ahove these heavens, To us invisible, or dimly seen In these...divine. Speak ye, who best can tell, ye sons of light, Angels, for ye behold him, and with songs And choral symphonies, day without ni^ht, Circle his tbrone,...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF