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" He above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent Stood like a tower. His form had yet not lost All her original brightness, nor appeared Less than Archangel ruined, and the excess Of glory obscured. "
Paradise Lost - Page xxx
by John Milton - 1896 - 408 pages
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The Columbia Granger's Dictionary of Poetry Quotations

Edith P. Hazen - Quotations, English - 1992 - 1172 pages
...rais'd Thir fainting courage, and dispel'd thir fears. (Bk. I, 1. 527-530) 57 Thir dread commander: er 110 When I heard the learn'd astronomer, When the proofs, the fi Towr; his form had yet not lost All her Original brightness, nor appear'd Less than Arch Angel ruind,...
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Reading the Classics and Paradise Lost

William Malin Porter - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 234 pages
...slipperiness of allusion can be suggested here by a single example. In Milton's description of Satan, that he above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent Stood like a tower, (Paradise Lost 1.589—91) Davis Harding sees an allusion to Vergil's description of Turnus, ipse inter...
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The Works of John Milton: With an Introduction and Bibliography

John Milton - English poetry - 1994 - 630 pages
...prowess, yet observed Their dread Commander: he, above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent, 590 Stood like a tower: his form had yet not lost All...Archangel ruined, and the excess Of glory obscured: as when the sun new-risen Looks through the horizontal misty air Shorn of his beams, or, from behind...
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Art of Darkness: A Poetics of Gothic

Anne Williams - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 336 pages
...notable in Satan, seem to appear in every generation. Here is how Milton describes the heroic Satan of Book I: He, above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent, Stood like a tower. His form had not yet lost All her original brightness, nor appeared Less than Archangel ruined, and the excess Of...
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Art of Darkness: A Poetics of Gothic

Anne Williams - Literary Criticism - 2009 - 319 pages
...notable in Satan, seem to appear in every generation. Here is how Milton describes the heroic Satan of Book I: He, above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent, Stood like a tower. His form had not yet lost All her original brightness, nor appeared Less than Archangel ruined, and the excess Of...
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Art of Darkness: A Poetics of Gothic

Anne Williams - Literary Criticism - 2009 - 319 pages
...notable in Satan, seem to appear in every generation. Here is how Milton describes the heroic Satan of Book I: He, above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent, Stood like a tower. His form had not yet lost All her original brightness, nor appeared Less than Archangel ruined, and the excess Of...
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John Milton: 1628-1731

John T. Shawcross - English poetry - 1995 - 292 pages
...worked up to a greater Sublimity, than that wherein his Person is described in those celebrated Lines: He, above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent Stood like a Tower, &c. [380-91] His Sentiments are every way answerable to his Character, and suitable to a created Being...
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Napoleon and English Romanticism

Simon Bainbridge - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 292 pages
...implication. 27 Wordsworth also commented upon Knight's analysis of the lines from Paradise Lost which begin: He above the rest, In shape and gesture proudly eminent, Stood like a tower... (i, 58-gI) This passage was particularly well known because Burke had chosen it as an instance...
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John Milton: 1732-1801

John T. Shawcross - Reference - 1995 - 512 pages
...by its immediate power, and with a sudden effect; as, in the description of Satan in ParadiseLost. He, above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent, Stood like a tow'r. [I, s89-91J A second species of the sublime consists in giving a gradation to imagery. There...
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Speak Silence: Rhetoric and Culture in Blake's Poetical Sketches

Mark L. Greenberg - English language - 1996 - 224 pages
...outlines. To illustrate his point Burke cites one of the powerful descriptions of Satan in Paradise Lost, Book I: he above the rest In shape and gesture proudly eminent Stood like a Tow'r; his form had yet not lost All her original brightness, nor appear'd Less than Arch-Angel ruin'd,...
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