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Arms, supposed grant of, to John Shakspeare, i. 1. Real grant and confirmation of, to him, 2, 3.

Arras Hangings, an article of furniture, in the age of Shakspeare, ii. 114, 115. Arthington (Henry), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 676. Arthur and Hubert, beautiful scene between, in the play of King John, ii. 422. Arthur's Chase, account of, i. 377, 378. Arthur's Round Table, a society of archers, account of, i. 562, 563.

Arval, or Funeral Entertainment, account of, i. 238.

Ascham (Roger), complaint of, on the little reward of schoolmasters, i. 27. note, 94. Improved the English language, 439. Remarks of, on the cultivation of classical literature in England, 450.; and of Italian literature, 452. Notice of his "Scholemaster," 454. His censure of the popularity of " La Morte d'Arthur," 524, 525. Design of his "Toxophilus,"

ii. 181.

Aske (James), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 676.

Asses' Heads, absurd recipe for fixing on the shoulders of man, ii. 351, 352. As You Like It, date of, ii. 431. Remarks on the general structure of its fable, 431, 432. Analysis of the character of Jaques, 433, 434.

Passages of this drama which are illus-
trated in the present work.

Act i. scene 2., i. 301.
Act ii. scene 1., i. 367. 403.
scene 7., i. 55. ii. 102.

Act iii. scene 2., ii. 115.

scene 3., i. 580.

scene 4., i. 556.

Act iv. scene 1., i. 580. ii. 157. Act v. scene 4., i. 288. ii. 159. The Epilogue, i. 218. Aubrey, statement of, respecting Shakspeare's being a butcher, i. 36. Probability of his account that Shakspeare had been a schoolmaster, 45. His character of the poet, ii. 615.

Avale (Lemeke), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 676.

Autolycus, remarks on the character of, ii. 500.

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Baldwyne's " Myrrour for Magistrates," account of, i. 708, 709.

Ballads, early English, notice of a collection of, i. 574-576. Quotations from and allusions to them by Shakspeare, 577-593.

Balnevis (Henry), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 676.

Bandello, principal novels of, translated by Paynter, i. 541. His novels wholly translated by Warner or Webbe, 543. Banquets, where taken, in the age of Shakspeare, ii. 144.

Barksted (William), encomiastic verses of, on Shakspeare's Venus and Adonis, ii. 30. Barley-Break, verses on, i. 309. How played, 310. Poetical description of, 311. Scottish mode of playing, 312. Barnefielde (Richard), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, works of, i. 676, 677. Character of his affectionate shepherd, 677. note t. Verses of, on Shakspeare's Venus and Adonis, and Lucrece, ii. 29. Barnes (Barnabe), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 677. Character of his Sonnets, ibid. note ‡.

(Juliana), the book of St. Alban's of, reprinted by Markham, i. 70. note. Dedication of it, ibid. Account of the edition, with extracts, 71, 72. notes. The treatyse of Fishing not written by her, 290. and note. Different editions of this work, 291.

Baronets, order of, when created, ii. 527. Their arms, 528.

Barry's "Ram Alley," illustrated, i. 224. Barson or Barston, village, allusion to by Shakspeare, i. 51.

Bastard (Thomas), notice of the epigrams of, i. 677. and note.

Batman (Stephen), a minor poet of the age
of Shakspeare, i. 677.
Batman's translation of "Bartholome de
Proprietatibus Rerum," well known to
Shakspeare, i. 485.

Bear-baiting, a fashionable amusement in the age of Elizabeth, ii. 176. Prices of entrance to the bear-gardens, 178. Beards, fashions of, in the age of Shakspeare, ii. 102, 108.

"Beards Wag all," the proverb of, explained, i. 143, 144. Beaufort (Cardinal), dying scene of, i. 390. Beaumont (Sir John), critical notices of, as a poet, i. 601, 602. His elegiac tribute His elegiac tribute to the memory of the Earl of Southampton, ii. 17, 18. How far he assisted Fletcher, 558.

433. Account of eminent bibliographers and bibliophiles of her court, 433436.

Bidford Topers, anecdote of them and
Shakspeare, i. 48-50.

Bieston (Roger), a minor poet of the
Shakspeare, i. 677.

age of Biographical Writers, during the age of Elizabeth, notice of, i. 482.

Birds, different modes of taking in the 16th century, i. 287. By means of stalkinghorses, 288. Bird-batting described,

289.

Beaumont and Fletcher, illustrations of the Blackfriars, theatre in, account of, ii. 209, plays of,

Čustom of the Country, i. 477.
Fair Maid of the Inn, i. 329.
Knight of the Burning Pestle, i. 477.
ii. 282. 'note.

Playhouse to Let, ii. 282. note.
Scornful Lady, i. 224.

Woman Pleased, act iv. sc. 1. i. 172,
173.

Beauty, exquisite taste for, discoverable in Shakspeare's works, ii. 616-618. Bedchambers, furniture of, in the age of Shakspeare, ii. 117.

Belemnites, or Hag-Stones, supposed virtues of, i. 367.

Belleforest's and Boisteau's "Cent Histoires Tragiques," a collection of tales, notice of,

i. 544.

Bells, why tolled at funerals, i. 232–234. Worn by Hawks, 268. Beltein, or rural sacrifice of the Scotch Highlanders on May-day, i. 152. "Bel-vedere, or the Garden of the Muses," a collection of poems, critical notice of, i. 725,726. List of contributors to it, 726, 727.

Benefices bestowed in Elizabeth's time on menial servants, i. 92. Betrothing, ceremony of, i. 220-223. Betterton (Mr.), visits Stratford, in quest of information concerning Shakspeare, i. 34. Beverley (Peter), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 677.

Bevis (Sir), of Southampton, notice of, i. 565. Allusions by Shakspeare to the romance of, 565, 566.

Bezoar stones, supposed virtues of, i. 367. Bibliography, cultivated by Queen Elizabeth, i. 428. Influence of her example,

210.

Black Letter books, chiefly confined to the time of Elizabeth, i. 438.

Blenerhasset (Thomas), a minor poet of the

age of Shakspeare, i. 677. *Additions made by him to the " Mirrour for Magistrates," 709.

Boar's-head, anciently the first dish brought to table, i. 76. Ceremonies attending it, 201. Verses on, ibid. 202.

Boccacio, principal novels of, translated by Paynter, i. 541.

Bodenham's (John), "Garden of the Muses," a collection of poems, i. 725. Critical notice of, 726. List of contributors to it, 726, 727.

Bodley (Sir Thomas), an eminent book col

lector, notice of, i. 433. Observation of King James I. on quitting the Bodleian library, 434.

Bolton (Edward), critical notice of his "Hypercritica; or Rule of Judgment for writing or reading our Historys," i. 476 -471.

Bond (Dr. John), an eminent Latin philologer, i. 454.

Booke of St. Albans, curious title and dedication of Markham's edition of, i. 70. note. Rarity of the original edition, 71. note, extract from, ibid, 72. note. Book of Sports, account of, i. 173, 174. Books, taste for, encouraged by Queen Elizabeth, i. 428. 433-435. Were anciently placed with their leaves outwards, 436. Were splendidly bound in the time of Elizabeth, 432. and note, 436. Hints on the best mode of keeping books, 436, 437. Remarks on the style in which they were executed, 437, 438.

Boors, or country clowns, character of, in the 16th century, i. 120-122. Boots, preposterous fashions of, in the age of Shakspeare, ii. 106, 107. Bourcher (Arthur), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 677. Bourman (Nicholas), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 677. Boys (Rev.John), an eminent Grecian, notice of, i. 454.

Bradshaw (Thomas), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 677. Brathwait's English Gentleman cited, i. 258, 259.

Brathwayte (Richard), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 677. Brawls, a fashionable dance in the age of Shakspeare, ii. 173. Different sorts of, ibid.

Bread, enumeration of different kinds of, in the age of Shakspeare, ii. 127. Breeches, preposterous size of, in the age of Shakspeare, ii. 104. and note. Breton (Nicholas), critical notice of the poems of, i. 602, 603.

Brewer's "Lingua," illustration of, i. 477. Brice (Thomas), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 678.

Bridal Bed, why blessed, i. 226. Bride, custom of kissing at the altar, i. 225. Supposed visionary appearances of future brides and bridegrooms, on MidsummerEve, 332-334. and on All-Hallow-Eve, 344-347.

Bride Ale (Rustic), description of, 227-229. Britton (Mr.), remarks of, on the monumental bust of Shakspeare, ii. 619, 620. Broke (Arthur), account of his "Tragicall Historye of Romeus and Juliet," ii. 357. and note.

Brooke, (Christopher) a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 678. Brooke (Thomas), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 678. Broughton (Rowland), a ininor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 678. Browne's (William), Britannia's Pastorals, quotations from, illustrative of ancient customs: -on May-day, i. 155. Critical notice of his merits as a poet, 603, 604, 605. Causes of his being neglected, 605.

-Brownie, a benevolent Scottish fairy, ac

count of, ii. 330-336. Resemblance between him and Shakspeare's Puck, 351. Brutus, character of, ii. 492. Brydges (Sir Egerton), on the merits of Lodge, as a poet, i. 633-635. Estimate of the poetical character of Sir Walter Raleigh, 640-642. Critical observations of, on the "Paradise of Daintie Devises," 714, 715. And on " England's Helicon," 721-723.

Bryskett (Lodowick), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, notice of, i. 678. and note. ‡

Buck (Sir George), a minor poet in the time of Shakspeare, i. 678. Buchanan's "Rerum Scoticarum Historia," character of, i. 477.

Bull-baiting, a fashionable amusement in the age of Shakspeare, ii. 176, 177. Bullokar's "Bref Grammar for English," notice of, i. 455, 456. His innovations in English spelling, satirised by Shakspeare, 472.

Burbadge, the player, notice of, i. 417. Burial, ceremony of, i. 232. Tolling the passing-bell, ibid. 233, 234. Lake wakes, described, 234-236. Vestiges of, in the north of England, 237. Funeral entertainments, 238. Garlands of flowers sometimes buried with the deceased, 240, 241. Graves planted with flowers, 242-244.

Burns, poetical description by, of the spells of All-Hallow-Eve, i. 346. Burton (William), critical notice of his "History of Leicestershire," i. 481. Burton's apology for May-games and sports, i. 174. Invective against the extravagance at inns, 219. His list of sports pursued in his time, 247. Portrait of the illiterate country gentlemen of that age, 430, 431. Eulogium on books and book collectors, 434, 435. The popular song of Fortune my Foe," cited by him, 577.

66

Burton on the Heath, allusion to, by Shakspeare, i. 50.

Bust of Shakspeare, in Stratford church, originality of, proved, ii. 620. Its character and expression injured through Mr. Malone's interference, 621.

Buttes (John), "Dyets Dry Dinner," curious extract from, ii. 218.

Byrd's (William), collection of "Tenor
Psalmes, Sonets, and Songs, of Pietie,"
&c. account of, i. 731.
Byron's (Lord), "Siege of Corinth" illus-
trated, ii. 411.

C

Cæsar. See Julius Cæsar.
Caliban, remarks on the character of, ii.
506. 523. 525.

Camden (William), character of his "An-
nals," i. 477.

Campbell's "Pleasures of Hope," character
of, i. 599.

Campion (Thomas), critical notice of his
"Observations on the Art of English
Poesie," i. 468, 469.

Canary Dance, account of, ii. 175.
Candlemas-day, origin of the festival, i.
138. Why called "Wives' Feast Day,"
ibid. Ceremonies for Candlemas-eve and
day, 139, 140, 141.

Capel (Mr.), Erroneous notions of, con-
cerning Shakspeare's marriage, i. 62.
His text of Shakspeare, one of the purest
extant, ii. 48. note.

Caps worn by the ladies, in the age of
Shakspeare, ii. 95.

Carbuncle, imaginary virtues of, i. 396. Al-
lusions to it, ibid. 397-399.
Cards, fashionable games of, in the age of
Shakspeare, ii. 169, 170. Were played in
the theatre by the audience before the
performance commenced, 217.
Carew (Richard), a minor poet of the age
of Shakspeare, i. 679.

Carew's "Survey of Cornwall," notice of,
i. 481.

Carols (Christmas), account of, i. 197-

202.

Carpenter (John), a minor poet of the age
of Shakspeare, i. 679.
Castiglione's "Cortegiano" translated into
English, i. 453.

Chair of Shakspeare, purchased by Prin-
cess Czartoryskya, i. 22, 23.
Chalkhill (John), critical notice of the
poems of, i. 605. 607. Singular beauty
of his pastorals, 606.

Chalmers (Mr.), probable conjecture of, on
the authenticity of Shakspeare's will, i.
15, 16. His hypothesis, concerning the

person to whom Shakspeare addressed
his sonnets, disproved, ii. 61, 62. Ex-
amination of his conjectures respecting
the date of Romeo and Juliet, 357, 358.
Of Richard III. 370, 371. Of Rich-
ard II. 376. Of Henry IV. Parts I. and II.
379. Of the Merchant of Venice, 385.
Of Hamlet, 391. Of King John, 419.
Of All's Well that Ends Well, 422, 423.
His opinion on the traditionary origin
of the Merry Wives of Windsor con-
troverted, 435, 436. His conjecture on
the date of Troilus and Cressida, 438.
Of Henry VIII. 442. Of Timon of
Athens, 444. Of Measure for Measure,
452. Of King Lear, 457. Of the
Tempest, 500-503. Of Othello, 528.
Of Twelfth Night, 532, 533.
Chapman (George), critical merits of as a
poet, i. 607, 608. His tribute to the me-
mory of the Earl of Southampton, ii.
17. Estimate of his merits as a dramatic
poet, 569, 570.
Characters, notice of writers of, in the age
of Elizabeth, i. 509-511. Sketch of
the public and private character of Queen
Elizabeth, ii. 146-151. and of James I.
151, 152. Of Shakspeare's drama, re-
marks on, ii. 545.

Charlcott-House, the seat of Sir Thomas
Lucy, notice of, i. 402.

Charms practised on Midsummer-Eve, i.
331-333. On All-Hallow-Eve, 344
-347. Supposed influence of, 362-

365.

Chaucer, poetical description of May-day
by, i. 153. Illustration of his "Assem-
blie of Fooles," 379, 380, 381. Descrip-
tion of the carbuncle, 396. Alluded to,
by Shakspeare, ii. 79. Allusions by
Chaucer to fairy mythology, 313. 317.
Chester (Robert), a minor poet, of the age
of Shakspeare, i. 679. Critical notice
of his "Love's Martyr," 728.
Chettle (Henry), a minor poet of the age
of Shakspeare, i. 679.

Children, absurdity of frightening by super-
stitious tales, i. 317. Notice of legen-
dary tales, of their being stolen or
changed by fairies, ii. 325-327.
Chivalric Amusements of Shakspeare's age,
described, i. 553-556.

Chivalry, influence of, on the poetry of the

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Christenings, description of, i. 230, 231. Christian IV. (King of Denmark), drunken entertainment given to, ii. 124, 125. Christian Name, the same frequently given to two successive children in the age of Queen Elizabeth, i. 4. note.

Christmas Brand, superstitious notion concerning, i. 140.

Christmas, festival of, i. 193. Of Pagan origin, 194. Ceremony of bringing in the Christmas block, ibid. 195. Houses decorated with ivy, &c. on ChristmasEve, 195, 196. Origin of this custom, 196. Custom of singing carols in the morning, 197. Gambols, anciently in Gambols, anciently in use at this season, 202-205, 206, note. Poetical description of, by Herrick, 206. and by Mr. Walter Scott, 207, 208. present how celebrated, 208. note. Church-Ales, account of, i. 177, 178. Churles and gentlemen, difference between, i. 71, 72.

At

Church-yard (Thomas), critical notice of the poems of, i. 608, 609.

Chute (Anthony), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 679. Chronological list of Shakspeare's plays, ii. 261, 262.

Cinthio (Giraldi), principal novels of, translated in the time of Shakspeare, i. 543. Citizens of London, dress of, in the age of Shakspeare, ii. 110, 111.

Clapham (Henoch), a minor poet of the age of Shakspeare, i. 679. Classical literature, diffusion of, in the reign of Elizabeth, i. 28. Fashionable

among country gentlemen, 82. Cultivated generally, 449, 450, 451. The knowlege of Greek literature greatly promoted by Sir Thomas Smith, and Sir Henry Savile, 453.; and Dr. Boys, 454. Latin literature promoted by Ascham, Grant, Bond, Rider, and others, 454, 455.

Claudio, remarks on the character of, in Measure for Measure, ii. 455. Cleanliness, attention of Shakspeare's fairies to, ii. 346, 347.

Cleaton (Ralph, a clergyman), character of, i. 92.

Cleopatra, remarks on the character of, ii.

493.

The

Clergymen, anciently styled Sir, i. 87-90. Picture of country clergymen in the age of Elizabeth, 90, 91. Their degraded state under James I. 92, 93. younger clergy, chiefly schoolmasters, 94. Bishop Hall's picture of their depressed state, 95. Prohibited from hawking, 259. note. Clerk-ale, notice of, i. 176.

Cloten, remarks on the character of, in Cymbeline, ii. 468.

Clothes, materials of, in the age of Elizabeth, ii. 91. How preserved, ibid. 92. Clown (country), character of in the 16th century, i. 120-122.

Coaches, when first introduced into England, ii, 146. Extravagant number of, used by the great, 147. "Cock and Pye," explanation of the phrase, i. 554.

Cockayn (Sir Aston), epigram of, on Wincot-ale, i. 48, 49.

Cock-fighting, a favourite sport in Shakspeare's age, i. 145. Awful death of a cock-fighter, 146. note.

Cocks, throwing at, a barbarous sport on Shrove-Tuesday, i. 145. and note. Ridiculed by Hogarth, ibid.; and now conpletely put down, 146.

Colet's (Dean), Grammatical Institutes, notice of, i. 26.

Combe (Mr. John), satyrical epitaph on, by Shakspeare, ii. 605. His character, ibid.

Combe (Mr. Thomas), notice of, ii. 629. note. Bequest to him by Shakspeare, 629. Comedy, "Gammer Gurton's Needle," the

first ever performed in England, ii. 227. Comedy of Errors, probable date of, ii. 286. Mr. Steevens' opinion that this drama was not wholly Shakspeare's, controverted and disproved, 287, 283. . Superior to the Menæchmi of Plautus, whence its fable is borrowed, 286-288. Exquisite portrait of Egeon, 288. General observations on this drama, 288, 289.

Passages of this drama, which are cited and illustrated in the present work. Act i. scene 1., ii. 364.

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