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XII.

Now through the morning doors behold 45
Phoebus array'd in burning gold,
Lashing his fiery steeds, displays
His warm and all enlight'ning rays.

XIII.

Now each one to his work prepares,
All that have hands are labourers,
And manufactures of each trade
By op'ning fhops are open laid.

XIV.
Hob yokes his oxen to the team,
The angler goes unto the stream,
The wood-man to the purlew hies,'
And lab'ring bees to load their thighs.

·

XV.
Fair Amaryllis drives her flocks,
All night fafe folded from the fox,
To flow'ry downs, where Collin ftrays,
To court her with his roundelays.

XVI.
The traveller now leaves his inn
A new day's journey to begin,
As he would poft it with the day,
And early rifing makes good way.

V. 55. purlews high.

50

55

60

XVII.

65

The flick-fac'd school-boy fachel takes, And with flow pace small riddance makes ; For why, the hafte we make, you know, To knowledge and to vertue's flow.

XVIII.

The fore-horse gingles on the road,
The waggoner lugs on his load,
The field with bufie people fnies,
And city rings with various cries.

XIX.
The world is now a bufie fwarm,
All doing good, or doing harm;
But let's take heed our acts be true,
For heaven's eye fees all we do.

XX.

None can that piercing fight evade,
It penetrates the darkest shade;

And fin, though it could fcape the eye,
Would be discover'd by the cry.

70

75

80

NOON QUATRAINS.

BY THE SAME,

I.

THE day grows hot, and darts his rays
From fuch a fure and killing place,
That this half world are fain to fly
The danger of his burning eye.

II.

His early glories were benign,
Warm to be felt, bright to be feen;
And all was comfort, but who can
Endure him when meridian?

III.

Of him we as of kings complain,
Who mildly do begin to reign,
But to the zenith got of pow'r,

Those whom they should protect devour.

5

10

IV.

Has not another Phaeton

Mounted the chariot of the fun,

And, wanting art to guide his horse, 15 Is hurri'd from the fun's due course,

V.

If this hold on, our fertile lands

Will foon be turn'd to parched fands,

grow,

And not an onion that will
Without a Nile to overflow.

VI.

The grazing herds now droop and pant,
E'en without labour fit to faint,
And willingly forfake' their meat,

To feek out cover from the heat.

VII.
The lagging ox is now unbound,
From larding the new turn'd up ground,
Whilft Hobbinol alike o'er-laid,

Takes his coarse' dinner to the shade.

VIII. Cellars and grottos now are best To eat and drink in, or to rest, And not a foul above is found Can find a refuge under ground.

IX.
When Pagan tyranny grew hot,
Thus perfecuted Christians got
Into the dark but friendly womb
of unknown fubterranean Rome.

V. 23. forfook.

V. 28. course.

20

25

30

35

X.

And as that heat did cool at laft,
So a few scorching hours o'er pafs'd,
In a more mild and temp❜rate ray
We may again enjoy the day.

EVENING QUATRAINS.

BY THE SAME.

I.

THE day's grown old, the fainting fun

Has but a little way to run;
And yet his steeds, with all his skill,
Scarce hug the chariot down the hill.

II.

With labour spent, and thirst opprest,
Whilft they strain hard to gain the Weft,
From fetlocks hot drops melted light,
Which turns' to meteors in the night.

III.
The shadows now fo long do grow,
That brambles like tall cedars show,
Mole-hills feem mountains, and the ant
Appears a monftrous elephant.

V, 8. turn.

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