Anecdotes of Painting in England;: With Some Account of the Principal Artists; and Incidental Notes on Other Arts;

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J. Dodsley, 1786 - Artists, British
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Page 269 - Ran nedlar, vifiting each plant, and fed Flow'rs worthy of Paradife, which not nice art In beds and curious knots, but nature boon Pour'd forth profufe on hill and dale and plain, Both where the morning fun firft warmly fmote The open field, and where the unpierc'd {hade Imbrown'd the noon-tide
Page 252 - With deeper red the full pomegranate glows.. The branch here bends beneath the weighty pear, And verdant olives flourifh round the year. * * * * * Beds of all various herbs, for ever green, In beauteous order terminate the fcene. Alcinous's garden was planted by
Page 276 - for that purpofe, if this piece of gardening had been then in as much vogue as it is now. " From the middle of this parterre is a defcent by many fteps flying on each fide of a grotto that lies between them,, covered with lead and flat, into the lower garden which is. all fruit-trees ranged
Page 273 - when I knew it about thirty years ago. It was made by the countefs of Bedford, efteemed among the greateft wits of her time, and celebrated by doctor Donne ; and with very great care, excellent contrivance, and much coft ; but greater fums may be thrown away without
Page 279 - whereas in regular figures it is .hard to make any great and remarkable faults.*' Fortunately Kent and a few others were not quite fo timid, or we might ftill be going up and down flairs in the open air. It is true, we have heard much lately, as
Page 288 - The contiguous ground of the park without the funk fence was to be harmonized with the lawn within ; and the garden in its turn was to be fet free from its prim regularity, that it might aflbrt with the wilder country without. The funk fence afcertained the fpecific garden, but that it might not draw too obvious a line of
Page 295 - through the gloom from the grotto to the opening day, the retiring and again aflembling {hades, the dufky groves, the larger lawn, and the folemnity of the termination at the cyprefles that lead up to his mother's tomb, are managed with exquifite judgment; and though lord Peterborough affifted him To form his quincunx and to rank his vines, thofe were not the
Page 304 - with fo ferious an air of wild and uncultivated extent, that •when you look down on this feeming foreft, you are amazed to find it contain a very few acres. In general, except as a fcreen to conceal fome deformity, or as a fhelter in
Page 279 - hardly advife any of thefe attempts in the figure of gardens among us, they are adventures of too hard achievement for any common hands : and though there may be more honour if they fucceed well, yet there is more
Page 288 - reafons. No fooner was this fimple enchantment made, than levelling, mowing and rolling, followed. The contiguous ground of the park without the funk fence was to be harmonized with the lawn within ; and the garden in its turn was to be fet free from its prim regularity, that it might

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