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" Such an act, That blurs the grace and blush of modesty; Calls virtue, hypocrite; takes off the rose From the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there"; makes marriage vows As false as dicers... "
A London Encyclopaedia, Or Universal Dictionary of Science, Art, Literature ... - Page 227
edited by - 1829
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Mr. William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet. Hamlet. Othello

William Shakespeare - 1767 - 384 pages
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Mr. William Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet ; Hamlet ; Othello

William Shakespeare - 1768 - 390 pages
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Hamlet. Titus Andronicus

William Shakespeare - 1788
...sense. 750 . Queen. What have I done, that thou dar'st wag thy tongue In noise so rude against me f Ham. Such an act, That blurs the grace and blush of modesty : Calls virtue, hypocrite ; takes off the rose iFrom the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there ; makes marriage vow* As false...
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Melancholy: As it Proceeds from the Disposition and Habit, the Passion of ...

Robert Burton - Melancholy - 1801 - 436 pages
...is, to ufe the words of Shake/pear, — — Such an a6l That blurs the grace and blush of modestyj Calls virtue hypocrite ; takes off the rose From the fair forehead of an innocent love-, , And sets a blister there; makes marriage vows As false as dicers' oaths: O such a deed As from the very body of...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 10

William Shakespeare - 1803
...sense. Queen. What have I done, that thou dar'st wag thy tongue In noise so rude against me ? Ham. i Such an act, That blurs the grace and blush of modesty...the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there ; makes marriage vows As false as dicers' oaths : O, such a deed As from the body of...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare, Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1804 - 642 pages
...against sense. Queen. What have I done, that thou dar'st wag thy tongue In noise so rude against me? Ham. Such an act, That blurs the grace and blush of modesty;...the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there; makes marriage vows As false as dicers' oaths: O, such a deed, As from the body of contraction...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 9

William Shakespeare - 1805 - 488 pages
...against sense. Queen. What have I done, that thou dar'st wag thy tongue In noise so rude against me? Ham. Such an act, That blurs the grace and blush of modesty;...the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there ; makes marriage vows As false as dicers' oaths : O, such a deed As from the body of...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare : Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 10

William Shakespeare - 1805 - 486 pages
...against sense. Queen. What have I done, that thou dar'st wag thy tongue In noise so rude against me? Ham. Such an act, That blurs the grace and blush of modesty;...the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there; makes marriage vows As false as dicers' oaths: O, such a deed As from the body of contraction8...
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Notes Upon Some of the Obscure Passages in Shakespeare's Plays: With Remarks ...

John Howe Baron Chedworth - 1805 - 392 pages
...passage in our author's writings at which I am so much offended as at this. P. 422.— 332.— 223. Ham. Such an act, That blurs the grace and blush of modesty ; Calls virtue, hypocrite ; takes of the rose From the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there. I incline to think...
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Remarks, Critical, Conjectural, and Explanatory, Upon the Plays of ..., Volume 2

E. H. Seymour - 1805 - 454 pages
...vice versa, has been noted already; and is, probably, the blunder of the transcriber or reciter. " . Takes off the rose " From the fair forehead of an innocent love." To establish Mr. Steevens's explanation of this passage, we must suppose that it was customary for...
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