The works of Samuel Johnson [ed. by F.P. Walesby].

Front Cover
George Cowie, 1825 - Literature

From inside the book

Contents


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 154 - So much I feel my genial spirits droop, My hopes all flat, nature within me seems In all her functions weary of herself ; My race of glory run, and race of shame, And I shall shortly be with them that rest.
Page 279 - You wait on nature's mischief! Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark, To cry " Hold, hold !
Page 156 - The Sun to me is dark And silent as the Moon, When she deserts the night Hid in her vacant interlunar cave. Since light so necessary is to life, And almost life itself, if it be true That light is in the Soul, She all in every part; why was the sight To such a tender ball as the eye confined?
Page 155 - Let there be light, and light was over all; Why am I thus bereaved thy prime decree? The sun to me is dark And silent as the moon, When she deserts the night Hid in her vacant interlunar cave.
Page 21 - What better can we do, than, to the place Repairing where he judged us, prostrate fall Before him reverent, and there confess Humbly our faults, and pardon beg, with tears Watering the ground, and with our sighs the air Frequenting, sent from hearts contrite, in sign Of sorrow unfeign'd and humiliation meek?
Page 228 - Is it not certain that the tragic and comic affections have been moved alternately with equal force, and that no plays have oftener filled the eye with tears, and the breast with palpitation than those which are variegated with interludes of mirth ? I do not however think it safe to judge of works of genius merely by the event.
Page 150 - He tugg'd, he shook, till down they came and drew The whole roof after them, with burst of thunder Upon the heads of all who sat beneath, Lords, ladies, captains, counsellors...
Page 154 - No strength of man or fiercest wild beast could withstand ; Who tore the lion...
Page 148 - But will arise and his great name assert : Dagon must stoop, and shall e're long receive Such a discomfit, as shall quite despoil him Of all these boasted Trophies won on me, And with confusion blank his Worshippers.
Page 279 - ... we do not immediately conceive that any crime of importance is to be committed with a knife ; or who does not, at last, from the long habit of connecting a knife with sordid offices, feel aversion rather than terror...

Bibliographic information