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The Being and Attributes of God esta.

blished, as the Foundation of Morality 225

Something exists; a Truth which no
Man can doubt

Something must, therefore, have always

existed, which exists necessarily

For an infinite Succession of Depen-

dent Causes produced one by another

is not a satisfying Account how some-

thing comes to exist now

Nor is the material World nor Chance,
the original Cause of Existence
The first Cause of Existence must be
One, viz. perfect in all possible con-
sistent Attributes-in Wisdom-in
Goodness-in Power-in Truth, or
Rectitude-and in every other natu-
ral and moral Attribute

That Virtue, or Reetitude, in a created

Being, is, a Conformity in Disposition

and Practice to the necessary and

unchangeable Rectitude of the Divine

227

ib.

ib.

230

ib.

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236

237

ib.

ib.

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THE

DIGNITY

OF

HUMAN NATURE.

BOOK I.

OF PRUDENCE.

INTRODUCTION.

To show what is truly great, ornamental, or useful, in life; to call the attention of mankind to objects worthy of their regard, as rational and immortal beings; to give a brief, but comprehensive account of the certain and established means for attaining the true end of our existence, happiness in the present and future states; is the design of the following essay.

The motives which engaged the author to attempt a task, confessedly too arduous for any single hand, were such as to him seemed sufficient to justify his aspiring, where even a failure, if not too shameful, must deserve praise; as encouragements from persons, for whom he joins with all mankind in having the most profound regard and veneration; the candour he has, in some more inconsiderable attempts, met with from the public; the hope of receiving improvement to himself from digesting and compiling such a work, and from the opinion of the judicious upon it: these several considerations had deservedly their respective influence. But what rendered the attempt more proper and necessary, was a direct view to the advantage of some young persons, in other parts of the world, as well as England, with whom his connexions are such as to give them a right to the fruit of his best abilities in the literary kind; and who will not probably fail to pay a peculiar regard to whatever comes from him.

VOL. I.

2

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