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T. and J. Allman, 1823 - English essays

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Page 228 - With these we may likewise rank the affected tribe of mimics, who are constantly taking off the peculiar tone of voice or gesture of their acquaintance; though they are such wretched imitators, that (like bad painters) they are frequently forced to write the name under the picture, before we can discover any likeness.
Page 55 - I have often beheld two of those sages almost sinking under the weight of their packs, like pedlars among us; who, when they met in the streets, would lay down their loads, open their sacks, and hold conversation for an hour together ; then put up their implements, help each other to resume their burthens, and take their leave.
Page 212 - U necessarily made up of young men and maids, we may naturally suppose, that there is a perfect concord and symphony between them; and, indeed, I have known it happen, that these sweet singers have more than once been brought into disgrace, by too close an unison between the thorough-bass and the treble.
Page 230 - However this may be, we may consider those whose tongues hardly seem to be under the influence of reason, and do not keep up the proper conversation of human creatures, as imitating the language of different animals. Thus, for instance, the affinity between Chatterers and Monkeys, and Praters and Parrots, is too obvious not to occur at once; Grunters and Growlers may be justly compared to Hogs; Snarlers are Curs that continually show their teeth, but never bite...
Page 210 - squire of the parish, or his ancestors perhaps, to testify their devotion, and leave a lasting monument of their magnificence, have adorned the altar-piece with the richest crimson velvet, embroidered with vine-leaves and ears of wheat ; and have dressed up the pulpit with the same splendour and...
Page 66 - That the Earth very narrowly escaped a Brush from the Tail of the last Comet, which would have infallibly reduced it to Ashes ; and that the next, which they have calculated for one and thirty Years hence, will probably destroy us.
Page 211 - This has occasioned great complaints in some places, where the clerk has been forced to bawl by himSelf, because the rest of the congregation cannot find the psalm at the end of their prayer-books; while others are highly disgusted at the innovation, and stick as obstinately to the Old Version as to the Old Style.
Page 230 - ... patience by pointing out all the pests of conversation ; nor dwell particularly on the Sensibles, who pronounce dogmatically on the most trivial points, and speak in sentences :....the Wonderers, who are always wondering what o'clock it is...
Page 210 - Dunstan's, serve the bells in capacity of clappers, by striking them alternately with a hammer. In other churches I have observed, that nothing unseemly or ruinous is to be found, except in the clergyman and the appendages of his person. The 'squire of the parish, or his ancestors perhaps, to testify their devotion, and leave a lasting monument of their magnificence, have adorned the altar-piece with the richest crimson velvet, embroidered with...

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