The Works of Jonathan Swift: Containing Additional Letters, Tracts, and Poems, Not Hitherto Published, Volume 13

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Page 306 - Damn with faint praise, assent with civil leer, And, without sneering, teach the rest to sneer ; Willing to wound, and yet afraid to strike, Just hint a fault, and hesitate dislike...
Page 147 - And strike to dust th' imperial tow'rs of Troy; Steel could the works of mortal pride confound, And hew triumphal arches to the ground. What wonder then, fair nymph! thy hairs should feel, The conqu'ring force of unresisted steel?
Page 153 - Or roll the planets through the boundless sky. Some less refined, beneath the moon's pale light, Pursue the stars that shoot athwart the night, Or suck the mists in grosser air below, Or dip their pinions in the painted bow, Or brew fierce tempests on the wintry main, Or...
Page 232 - A man should never be ashamed to own he has been in the wrong, which is but saying, in other words, that he is wiser to-day than he was yesterday.
Page 144 - Or o'er the glebe distil the kindly rain; Others on earth o'er human race preside, Watch all their ways, and all their actions guide: Of these the chief the care of nations own, And guard with arms divine the British throne. 'Our humbler province is to tend the fair, Not a less pleasing, though less glorious care; To save the powder from too rude a gale, Nor let th...
Page 148 - With his broad sabre next, a chief in years, The hoary Majesty of Spades appears, Puts forth one manly leg, to sight reveal'd, The rest his many-colour'd robe conceal'd.
Page 64 - Ye gods, annihilate but space and time, And make two lovers happy!
Page 147 - Warn'd by the sylph, oh pious maid, beware ! This to disclose is all thy guardian can : Beware of all, but most beware of man ! He said ; when Shock, who thought she slept too long, Leap'd up, and waked his mistress with his tongue.
Page 310 - See how the world its veterans rewards! A youth of frolics, an old age of cards; Fair to no purpose, artful to no end; Young without lovers, old without a friend; A fop their passion, but their prize a sot; Alive, ridiculous; and dead, forgot!
Page 357 - And sensible soft melancholy. " Has she no faults then (Envy says), sir ? " Yes, she has one, I must aver : When all the world conspires to praise her, The woman's deaf and does not hear.

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