Die garten, ein wort seiner zeit, mit einem gartenromane und verzeichnisse der in Illerfeld vorhandenen pflanzen

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1820 - 338 pages
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Page 58 - Flowers of all hue, and without thorn the rose : Another side, umbrageous grots and caves Of cool recess, o'er which the mantling vine Lays forth her purple grape, and gently creeps Luxuriant...
Page 56 - Of a steep wilderness, whose hairy sides With thicket overgrown, grotesque and wild, Access denied; and overhead up £rew Insuperable height of loftiest shade, Cedar, and pine, and fir, and branching palm, A sylvan scene; and, as the ranks ascend Shade above shade, a woody theatre. Of stateliest view.
Page 57 - Down the steep glade, and met the nether flood, Which from his darksome passage now appears; And now, divided into four main streams, Runs diverse, wandering many a famous realm And country, whereof here needs no account...
Page 57 - With mazy error under pendent shades Ran nectar, visiting each plant, and fed Flowers worthy of Paradise, which not nice Art In beds and curious knots, but Nature boon Pour'd forth profuse on hill, and dale, and plain, Both where the morning sun first warmly smote The open field, and where the unpierced shade Imbrown'd the noontide bowers; thus was this place A happy rural seat of various view...
Page 56 - Insuperable height of loftiest shade, — Cedar, and pine, and fir, and branching palm, — A sylvan scene; and, as the ranks< ascend 140 Shade above shade, a woody theatre Of stateliest view.
Page 57 - But rather to tell how, if art could tell, How from that sapphire fount the crisped brooks, Rolling on orient pearl and sands of gold, With mazy error under pendent shades, Ran nectar, visiting each plant, and fed Flowers worthy of Paradise, which not nice art In beds and curious knots, but nature boon Pour'd forth profuse on hill, and dale, and plain...
Page 58 - The birds their choir apply ; airs, vernal airs, Breathing the smell of field and grove, attune The trembling leaves, while universal Pan, Knit with the Graces and the Hours in dance, Led on the eternal Spring.
Page 56 - Yet higher than their tops The verd'rous wall of Paradise up sprung : Which to our general sire gave prospect large Into his nether empire neighb'ring round. And higher than that wall a circling row Of goodliest trees, loaden with fairest fruit, Blossoms and fruits at once of golden hue...
Page 57 - Thus was this place A happy rural seat of various view : Groves whose rich trees wept odorous gums and balm ; Others, whose fruit, burnish'd with golden rind, Hung amiable, Hesperian fables true, If true, here only, and of delicious taste.
Page 57 - Rose a fresh fountain, and with many a rill Water'd the garden ; thence united fell Down the steep glade, and met the nether flood, Which from his darksome passage now appears ; And now divided...

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