Page images
PDF
EPUB

There was a Welch contingent collected by a process similar to that by which these 500 archers were brought into the field. John Morbury, who was then the king's chamberlain of South Wales, engaged the services of 20 men-at-arms and 500 archers, to serve for forty-five days and a half from the 6th of July; each man-at-arms at 12d. per day, each mounted archer 6d., and each archer on foot 4d. They were collected in the counties of Carmarthen, Cardigan, and Brecknock. Carmarthen and Cardigan supplied 10 men-at-arms, 13 archers on horseback, and 327 foot archers. Brecknock supplied 10 men-at-arms, 14 mounted archers, and 126 archers on foot. There is a complete list of the names, in which also, in most instances, the particular parish or district to which each person belonged, is specified; but no account has been recovered of the subsequent fortunes of this part of the army. Their time of service would have expired before

the Agincourt day. Perhaps they never left England.

VII. PERSONS, NOT MILITARY, ATTACHED TO THE ARMY.

EDMUND LACY, Dean of the Chapel, “deinlostell n're Seigneur le Roy," and 30 chaplains and clerks of the said Chapel. The Dean having 3 archers attending upon him, and the 30 chaplains and clerks having each an archer.

His

MR. RICHARD HALS, clerk, "in legibus licentiatus." vadia was 2 shillings a day; his clerk, 12d., and 2 archers, at 6d. each. He was ready at Southampton on the 8th of July. John Hogeley was his clerk. Of the 2 archers, John Alisaundre was at Harfleur, and Henry Watty at Agincourt. Hals himself was dead when the Account was rendered.

LEICESTER, GUIENNE, and IRELAND KINGS-AT-ARMS, and

HEREFORD MARSHALL-OF-ARMS.-Covenanted to serve at 12d. a day, and gave the receipt for the Prest money.

THOMAS MORISTEDE and WILLIAM BRADWARDINE.-They covenanted to serve with 6 archers and 11 " 'sirgiens," and received jewels in pawn on the 20th of June. Bradwardine had 3 archers with him.

JOHN CLIFFE, minstrel.-He had it in command from the King to attend with 17 of his companions. His pay was 12d. a day. He appears to have served through the whole campaign and to have returned to England with the King; but he was dead when the Account was rendered.

SIR WILLIAM TROPPENEL, knight, "serviens scissorie infra Magnam Garderobam Regis Henrici quinti."-His vadia was 12d. per day, without the regardum consuetum. He had 2 archers and 6 valets in his company. He was ready at Southampton on the 8th of July, and claims for service to the 16th of November, on which day the king landed at Dover. In the Indenture of Jewels we obtain further insight into the kind of service rendered by Troppenel. He is there described as "William Troppenel, sergeant de la Taillerie," and he indented to bring 6 archers and 6 "vadlets taillours."

GEORGE BENNET, cordwainer of London. He claims for himself at 12d. a day, and for 24 other persons of the same craft, at 6d. They were with the army during the whole period.

There were also labourers or workmen of all kinds :-100 masons, at the head of whom was JOHN BENNET; 120 carpenters, at the head of whom was THOMAS MATTHEW; 120 miners, the chief of whom was HENRY DEANE; 120 labourers, under REYNOLD JOHN; 42 smiths, the chief of whom was WILLIAM MARSH. PETER GASCOIGN was the chief of 24 cannoniers and

68 "serviteurs."

JOHN SOUTHMADE had 15 carriers under

him. William Marsh is designated "esquire.'

It still remains to be observed that we have most authentic traces of several persons, not previously named, who were present in this expedition. Beside that there are names in the Retinue Rolls of the great captains which were famous in England, persons who did not themselves indent or account, there are certain documents which contain many names, some of which it is proper now to lay before the reader.

The first is a File of Writs of Privy Seal addressed to the Treasurer and Chamberlains of the Exchequer, before the expedition set out, commanding them to account with certain persons who were about to serve in the voyage which the king had undertaken, notwithstanding that no Indenture had been entered into. The persons are "n're amie esquier JOHAN HORSEY;" "JOHAN STEVENES, chapellayn;" HENRIC VAN RISMGHE, LAURENT VAN ORAN, MAIE ELERES, PETRE BOGHEMAKER, HEARSTEP VAN HEARLAM, and GHEVIIT VANDEN GUIDE or ENIDE, the cannoniers; RICHARD BARRY, JOHN HARDYNG, JOHN LAYBROKE, and GREGORY HOWELL; NICHOLAS LYNNYNARMOURER and NICHOLAS BRAMPTON, lynnynarmourers; WILLIAM DE ATHERTON, esquier, NICHOLAS ASHTON, "n're

* One of the king's master carpenters, named John Janyn, in the reign of Henry the Sixth, rendered an account of several years' service in France, but in the absence of precise dates, it cannot be determined that any of the services were rendered in the Agincourt expedition. He claims for a bridge of leather, among other things, to be carried to Harfleur, and for carrying the said bridge to divers other towns in different parts of Normandy and France; also for making a bridge of timber at Rouen, and laying a great chain of iron on piles across the Seine.

amie varlet RICHARD FAYRMAYDEN," "n're amie esquier JANICO DARTUS," with 10 men-at-arms and 30 archers, "n're amie esquier REIGNALD COURTEYS," with 2 men-at-arms and 6 archers; "n're bien amie esquier JOHAN WATERTON;" "n're amie serviteur ROBERT FELTON, clerc de n're closet;" "n're bien amie THOMAS AP HENRI ;" and "n're cher et foial chevalier NICHOLAS LONGFORD.” It does not appear that any of these persons, except the last, presented accounts like to those of the persons who indented. We recognize one name which is remarkable, John Hardyng, the chronicler; of whom it is known, from other authorities, that he was with the king at Harfleur and Agincourt. John Waterton was Master of the Horse, and in the Account which he rendered of that office, for the Agincourt year, we find some particulars relating to this expedition. At the beginning of the year the king's stud consisted of 233 horses, many of which were taken by the king to France, where some died of the murrain, and 25 are returned as having been killed or lost at Agincourt. The horses so lost are specifically namedLyard Stirkland, Lyard Gloucester, Grey Cornwall, Lyard Coke, Bayard Chaucer, Morell Kene, Lyard York, Sorell Tawstock, &c. Most of the names seem to be those of persons by whom they had been presented. Only 98 horses remained to be carried to the next year's account.

Many persons, who were of the king's household, were in the expedition. Twenty-four 'vadletes del hostiell' of the king entered together into an Indenture of Receit, as did 12 others. Ralph Appelton, clerk of the avenery, William Peck, under clerk of the spicery, and other officers of that class, were also in it, as John Besill, clerk of the bakehouse, and several persons described as messengeres del chambre' of the king;

John Hereford, John Barwell, John Mildenhale, clerks of the chapel, Robert Castell, clerk of the marshalry, engaged to serve with 3 archers in attendance.

Again: there is a Muster Roll of the garrison of Harfleur, under the Earl of Dorset, taken in the months of January, February, and March immediately following the battle. It consisted of 4 barons, 22 knights, 273 men-at-arms, and 798 archers. Most of these we may presume had been left behind when the king marched on to Agincourt; but some may have been at the battle, and instead of proceeding with the King to Calais, had returned to Harfleur. The four barons were, the Lords HASTINGS, GREY DE WILTON, BOURCHIER, and CLINTON AND SAY. The knights were:

THE BARON CARROC,
SIR THOMAS ELKEDSALE,
SIR ROBERT HARLING,
SIR JOHN GREYNDOUR,
SIR JOHN RADCLIFFE,
SIR JOHN SKYDMORE,
SIR JOHN FASTOLF,
SIR WILLIAM ISENDEYN,
SIR JOHN KNEVET,

SIR BALDWIN FREVILE,

SIR ANDREW ACTON,
SIR JOHN GRISELEY,
SIR JOHN BAGOT,
SIR JOHN GRAA,
SIR WILLIAM GRANNSON,
SIR ROBERT CHALONER,
SIR RICHARD ARUNDEL,
SIR PHILIP LEECH,

SIR JOHN BLOUNT,

SIR JOHN BLAKET,

SIR JOHN BASKERVILE.

It will be observed that several of these names have occurred before. The list of men-at-arms presents some eminent names, but it is too long to be conveniently inserted in this place, especially as that any of them were at the battle, or indeed in the early part of the expedition, is but supposititious and conjectural.

The last is the Roll of the "Malades" at Harfleur, to which we have already had such frequent occasion to refer. But there

« PreviousContinue »