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CXCIX.

ON A PLAGIARIST.

A Duke once declared, and most solemnly too, That whatever he liked with his own he would do. But the son of a Duke has gone farther, and shown He will do what he likes with what isn't his own.

[From Punch.]

Anon.

CC.

ON SOME VERSES CALLED TRIFLES.

Paul, I have read your book, and, though you write ill, I needs must praise your most judicious title !

Anon.

87

BOOK III.

The Church and the Clergy-Universities and

Scholars.

THE CHURCH AND THE CLERGY.

CCI.

A COURT AUDIENCE.

Old South, a witty Churchman reckon'd,
Was preaching once to Charles the Second,
But much too serious for a Court,
Who at all preaching made a sport.
He soon perceiv'd his audience nod,
Deaf to the zealous man of God.
The Doctor stopp'd; began to call,
"Pray wake the Earl of Lauderdale :
My lord! why 't is a monstrous thing!
You snore so loud, you'll wake the king!"

Richard Graves (1715-1804).

[An old story versified. Robert South (1633-1716) was one of the most famous of our old preachers. See his Sermons (1823, 1843, 1850).]

CCII.

ON DR. SHERLOCK THE ELDER.

The same allegiance to two kings he pays,
Swears the same faith to both, and both betrays.
No wonder if to swear he 's always free,

Who has two Gods to swear by more than we.

Thomas Brown (d. 1704).

[This alludes to Sherlock's desertion of the cause of James II. for that of William III., and to his views on the subject of the Trinity, the unity of which he to some extent denied, with the result of intensifying the separate individuality of the Three Persons. Sherlock the younger emulated his father's conduct, preaching a revolutionary sermon on the Sunday immediately following upon the battle of Preston. Hence the following epigram.]

CCIII.

ON BOTH DOCTORS SHERLOCK.

As Sherlock the elder with his jure divine
Did not comply 'till the Battle of Boyne,

So Sherlock the younger still made it a question
Which side he would take 'till the Battle of Preston.

Anon.

[Dr. William Sherlock (1641-1707) published his Vindication of the Doctrine of the Trinity in 1690, and it was replied to by South in some Animadversions published in 1693, and in his Tritheism charged on Dr. Sherlock's New Notion of the Trinity (1695). The younger Sherlock was Bishop of London (16781751).]

CCIV.

ON BISHOP BURNET.

If heaven is pleased when sinners cease to sin,
If hell is pleased when sinners enter in,

If men are pleased at parting with a knave,
Then all are pleased-for Burnet's in his grave.

Anon.

[Burnet died in 1715. Dryden described him in The Hind and the Panther as

"A theologue more by need than genial bent,
By breeding sharp, by nature confident;

Interest in all his actions was discern'd

More learn'd than honest, more a wit than learn'd."

See Book II., No. CXL.]

CCV.

ON A PICTURE OF JUDAS, PAINTED TO RESEMBLE
BISHOP KENNET.

To say the picture does to him belong,
Kennet does Judas and the painter wrong.
False is the image, the resemblance faint;
Judas compar'd to Kennet was a saint.

Anon.

[See Nichols' Literary Anecdotes. Bishop Kennet (16601728), at that time Dean of Peterborough, offended the Tory and Church party by the support he accorded to the Whigs, and one London clergyman actually had an altar-piece placed in his church in which Judas was so represented as greatly to resemble the unfortunate prelate. Besides the above, Bishop Atterbury

is said to have written a Latin epigram on the same subject, the English version of which runs :—

"Think not that here thou art represented;
Thou 'rt not like Judas, for he repented."]

CCVI.

ON BISHOP ATTERBURY'S BURYING THE DUKE OF
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE (1720).

"I have no hope," the Duke he says, and dies;
"In sure and certain hope," the prelate cries :
Of these two learned peers, I prithee say, man,
Who is the lying knave, the priest or layman?
The Duke he stands an infidel confest;

"He's our dear brother," quoth the lordly priest.
The Duke, tho' knave, still "brother dear" he cries;
And who can say, the reverend prelate lies?

Matthew Prior (1664–1721).

[John Sheffield, Duke of Buckinghamshire, died in 1720. Johnson wrote of him: "His religion he may be supposed to have learned from Hobbes, and his morality was such as naturally proceeds from loose opinions."]

CCVII.

ON BISHOP ATTERBURY'S SERMONS.

When Willis of Ephraim heard Rochester preach,
Thus Bentley said to him, "I prithee, dear brother,
How lik'st thou this sermon? 't is out of my reach."
"His is one way," said Willis, "and ours is another:
I care not for carping, but this I can tell,

We preach very sadly, if he preaches well."

Matthew Prior.

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