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" pregnant : what in me is dark Illumine, what is low raise and support ; That, to the highth of this great argument, I may assert Eternal Providence, And justify the ways of God to men. Say first—for Heaven hides nothing from "
Paradise Lost: A Poem in Twelve Books - Page 6
by John Milton - 1903 - 372 pages
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Temple Bar, Volume 40

English periodicals - 1874
...and thus implores: " What we see dark, Illumine, what is low raise and support; That, to the height of this great argument, I may assert eternal Providence, And justify the ways of God to men." Pope thinks he can do no better than appropriate this last line of Milton ; and when...
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Paradise Lost: With Notes, Selected from Newton and Others, to ..., Volumes 1-2

John Milton, Samuel Johnson - 1796 - 608 pages
...present, and with mighty wings outspread Dove-like sat'st brooding on the vast abyss, 21 And mad'st it pregnant. What in me is dark Illumine, what is low raise and support; That to the height of this great argument I may assert eternal Providence, 25 And justify the ways of God to Men....
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Paradise lost, a poem. Pr. from the text of Tonson's correct ed. of 1711

John Milton - 1801 - 394 pages
...present, and with mighty wings outspread 20 Dove-like sat'st brooding on the vast abyss, And mad'st it pregnant: What in me is dark Illumine, what is low raise and support; That to the height of this great argument I may assert eternal Providence, 25 And justify the ways of God to Men....
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The poetical works of John Milton, with the life of the author ..., Volumes 1-2

John Milton - 1807 - 514 pages
...And mad'st it pregnant: what in me is dark Illumin, what is low raise and support; That to the height of this great argument I may assert eternal Providence, And justify the ways of God to men. Say first, forHeav'n hides nothing from thy Nor the deep tract of Hell, say first what cau Mov'd our grand...
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An Abridgment of Lectures on Rhetoric

Hugh Blair - English language - 1808 - 330 pages
...cases it is best to sacrifice sound to sense. For instance, in the following lines of Milton : —— What in me is dark, Illumine ; what is low, raise and support. The sense clearly dictates the pause after illumine," which ought to be observed ; though, if melody...
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Four Discourses on Subjects Relating to the Amusement of the Stage: Preached ...

James Plumptre - Theater - 1809 - 318 pages
...present, and with mighty Avings outspread, Dove-like sat'st brooding on the vast Abyss, And mad'st it pregnant: what in me is dark Illumine ! what is low raise and support! That to the height of this great argument I may assert eternal Providence, And justify the ways of GOD to man....
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The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: Including ..., Volume 7

Alexander Chalmers - English poetry - 1810
...present, and, with mighty wings out spread, Dove-like sat'st brooding on the vast abyss, And mad'st it pregnant : what in me is dark, Illumine ; what is low, raise and support ; That to the heighth of this great argument I may assert eternal Providence, And justify the ways of God to men....
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Paradise Lost, and the Fragment of a Commentary upon it by William Cowper

William Hayley - Poets, English - 1810
...present, and with mighty wings outspread Dove-like sat'st brooding on the vast abyss, And mad'st it pregnant: what in me is dark, Illumine; what is low, raise and support; That to the height of this great argument I may assert eternal Providence, Andjjustify the ways of Ged to men....
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The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - Readers - 1810 - 262 pages
...worse, if the sense were sacrificed to the sound. For instance, in the following line of Milton, -" What in me is dark, " Illumine ; what is low, raise and support:" the sense clearly dictates the pause after illumine, at the end of the third syllable, which, in reading,...
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The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Poetry, Selected from the Best ...

Lindley Murray - Readers - 1811 - 253 pages
...worse, if the sense were sacrificed to the sound. For instance, in the following line of Milton, ' What in me is dark, "Illumine ; what is low, raise and support:" the sense clearly dictates the pause aler illumine, at the end of the third syllable, which, in reading,...
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